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Sir Humphrey Covid

It's interesting how so many sentences and ideas now trail off into the inevitable denouement "… but that didn't happen because of Covid"…"We had to change plans because of Covid." It's as though Sir Humphrey Covid is some VIP, for whom doors must be opened and the seas must part. Or, as though Covid is an unexpected first born baby to a couple in their 40s whose lives are now utterly transformed. "We couldn't celebrate Henry's birthday this year because of … Baby Covid." "Covid" could be anything or anyone terribly important - one's mother in law arriving from Europe or a visitation from a long dead relative. All must stop … for Covid!

Intergenerational report (IGR) 2021: Sustainable Population Australia responds

Sustainable Population Australia (SPA) believes there is nothing to fear from the downward projection of population size in the Inter-Generational Report (IGR) from 40 million to 38.8 million by 2061. National President Jenny Goldie says what is to be feared are the environmental, social and economic cost of adding another 13 million people to the population.

EveryAGE Counts: "Smaller, older Australia need not be feared if we can crush ageism"

The new Intergenerational Report (IGR) has projected Covid will make Australia’s population smaller and older than earlier predicted, but that need not be a problem if we can take real steps to end the blight of ageism, according to the EveryAGE Counts campaign. EveryAGE Counts is funded by the The Benevolent Society

In launching the IGR, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said the government remains committed to funding essential services while maintaining a sustainable tax burden. EveryAGE Counts Campaign Director Marlene Krasovitsky, said the key to achieving these goals is making a concerted effort to fight ageism.

"Ageism is now a huge drag on our economic growth," Ms Krasovitsky said.

Downsizing cost trap awaits retirees – five reasons to be wary

Add up all the neglected costs of downsizing and retirees have good reason to be wary of making the move. It’s time to debunk the myth of zero housing costs in retirement if we want to understand why retirees resist downsizing. Retirees have at least five reasons to be wary of the costs of downsizing. [Article first published at https://theconversation.com/downsizing-cost-trap-awaits-retirees-five-reasons-to-be-wary-80895 on 31 July 2017.]

Zombie grandmas: How to make the most of getting old

About three years ago, I made the big mistake of looking too closely into my bathroom mirror. Yuck! All I could see was nothing but wrinkles and gray hair. But wait -- I was never supposed to have actually ever gotten old! This was never supposed to have happened! But it did -- at least to my body if not my mind.

"So," I said to myself, "what the freak can I do with OLD?" I know! I'll become an actor! And so I did.

Elderly 'have internalised' message they're a burden on society, says physician Karen Hitchcock

Video and transcript inside: Dr Karen Hitchcock: "My core message is that we really need to think about our ageing population as a triumph and really rethink what it means to be old and what it's possible to do when you're elderly. Most elderly people are not sick, most of them are not in nursing homes, but I think we can do a lot more to integrate elderly people back into our communities and try and reimagine what it is that we want our communities to be. I think we need to start from an ethical perspective of what we want our community to be, and then from that, imagine our society and then find ways to create it and fund it, rather than starting from an economic position." Congratulations to the 7.30 Report, Karen Hitchcock and Quarterly essay for criticising the appalling depiction and treatment of Australia's elderly, implicitly and explicitly advocated by the growth lobby in the mainstream media and government. See, for instance, "Should Jeannie Pratt and Elisabeth Murdoch downsize to high rises in Activity Centers to give young people more room?" The negative message about the elderly has been so overwhelming that most of us find it exhausting to fight. The ABC has often also carried this message uncritically. Perhaps it took a woman-led news commentary program - the 7.30 Report - to try to break this mould. Dr Karen Hitchcock (who is a staff physician in acute and general medicine at a large city public hospital) is a very effective ambassador for the elderly, although she is a young woman herself. Her work deserves our collective support and promotion.

Who do you know that is likely to live to 150 years old? Susan Ryan and Joe Hockey's workhouse speculations

Age Discrimination Commissioner, Susan Ryan thinks that Treasurer Joe Hockey somehow deserves congratulations for suggesting that people's life expectancy may extend to 150 on the basis of some very speculative 'medical science'. [1] Futhermore, she's using this medical theory to jump on the moving retirement goal bandwagon. [2]
Is Susan Ryan, losing her marbles or simply doing what she has to to keep her job? Who do you know that you think is likely to live until they are 150 years old? And who do you know that wants to work until 70 or beyond? The value of elderly people is being sold out by the likes of Susan Ryan and Joe Hockey

HSBC's Bloxham fails 'Aging Population 101' saying More Asian migration would help Australia

"Allowing more migration from Asia could help Australia cope with the challenges of its ageing population, a leading economist says," quoth Fairfax Digital. Ditto Murdoch's Australian: "More Asian migration would help Aust: HSBC". The 'leading economist' is Paul Bloxham, who is employed by HSBC Australia bank with the title of 'chief economist and spokesperson'. The publishing media are heavily invested in marketing Australian real estate to the world.

Welcome to Big Australia dystopia - why some people want it


Aztec-like, "Welcome to a Big Australia" harbingers the elites' desired crammed Australia with a symbolic child sacrifice, Alexander of Malvern East. As with the best traditional victims, Alexander, who looks about 5 years old, has no say in his fate. Innocence is what the gods and the elites require. Mathew Dunckley's "Welcome to a Big Australia", Australian Financial Review 3-5 January 2014, is one among several curious articles linking immigration and housing to a 'Big Australia'. Curious because this big population scenario is portrayed, on the one hand as inevitable, and on the other hand, as in need of promoting in case it does not happen. Curious in many other ways as well.

Problem private Migration agencies stimulate aging, overpopulation in Australia

Ausfis is one of many private immigration agencies in Australia promoting a problematic political message that sounds like they are representing all Australians and the Australian government and which many Australians would disagree with. Should migration agencies aggressively promote immigration? It's another case of advertising taking over democracy.

Population Pressure, Age Discrimination, Reverse mortgage and other Risks to Property Ownership in Australia

We applaud the initiatives of the Gillard Federal Government today in refunding Aged Care. PM unveils $3.7bn overhaul of aged care, Friday April 20, 2012. We are particularly impressed to read that: "The [Gillard] government rejected a Productivity Commission recommendation that proposed allowing the use of reverse mortgage facilities to help fund care costs." Good on the Gillard government! Reverse mortgages steal inheritances, impoverish youth and render them homeless, and amount to double charges for old age care provision (on top of taxes). We republish a relevant and well-researched article on this matter. See also "Ageism" and ABC article on reverse mortgages.Article by Sheila Newman with Jill Quirk

RAge against the growth lobby ...

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rage at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light....
Brendan Behan's famous poem evoques wise old men, but we think that widows should rage as much as widowers, of course. Or sit down to a nice relaxing cup of tea with the dog and the cat in the absence of packs of screaming children and demanding husbands. See also "Should Jeannie Pratt and Elisabeth Murdoch downsize to high rises in Activity Centers to give young people more room?"

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Should Jeannie Pratt and Elisabeth Murdoch downsize to high rises in Activity Centers to give young people more room?

Committee for Melbourne growthers are scraping the bottom of the barrel looking for new ways to get people to move to the hated high-rises the property development lobby has planned all over Melbourne. Mary Drost says, "Both Andrew McLeod and Bernard Salt are obsessed with growth. It is exactly this growth that is making Melbourne less liveable as everything is overstretched." Jill Quirk asks, "I wonder if Salt and MacLeod think widows Jeannie Pratt or Elisabeth Murdoch should vacate their premises for a flat in an "activity centre" or is just people who inhabit more modest post war triple fronted accommodation who are being asked to move over ?"

Discussing Australia's Dependency ratio 2009 with graph by Dr Katharine Betts

We look at Dr Katharine Betts's latest graph of ABS statistics on the ratio of working to dependent in Australia, noting that it is both untrue and discriminatory to imply that the 'Aged' are by far the biggest group of 'dependents.' In relation to the graph, we also look at the role of land-use planning and the social division of work in industrial society in creating financial dependencies where none previously existed. We note that established financial and institutional investment in the post-war industrial-contractual model makes it inflexible and resistant to changes in economic feedback, but that change it must as fossil fuels deplete. Left to their own devices, Australians would probably return to the human default social organisation around kin and place, which is flexible and low cost. This will only become possible, however, with cheaper land and an economic system which permits increasing relocalisation and more flexible use of land than the current plans for packed appartments and dense dormitory-suburbs anticipate.

Mark O'Connor's take on Bernard Salt's Ageist article

The Australian has run yet another beat-up by KPMG corporate partner, Bernard Salt, trying desperately to justify continued high immigration. Mark O'Connor, author of Overloading Australia comments.

Catastrophists versus Cornucopians

srcPopulation growth advocates insist that human ingenuity is capable of solving all possible challenges posed by resource scarcity no matter how large the world's human population becomes, yet they also apparently believe that human ingenuity is incapable of solving what would seem to be of far easier problem to solve, that is, of providing for a larger proportion of elderly members in societies that have stabilised their populations.

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